Hunger study predicts 168,000 pandemic-linked child deaths

Hunger study predicts 168,000 pandemic-linked child deaths

The Associated Press

3h ago / 5:38 AM UTC

PARIS — Economic fallout from the coronavirus pandemic has set back decades of progress against the most severe forms of malnutrition and is likely to kill 168,000 children before any global recovery takes hold, according to a study released Monday by 30 international organizations.

The study from the Standing Together for Nutrition Consortium draws on economic and nutrition data gathered this year as well as targeted phone surveys. Saskia Osendarp, who led the research, estimates an additional 11.9 million children — most in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa — will suffer from stunting and wasting, the most severe forms of malnutrition.

Women who are pregnant now “will deliver children who are already malnourished at birth, and these children are disadvantaged from the very start,” said Osendarp, executive director of the Micronutrient Forum. “An entire generation is at stake.”

The fight against malnutrition had been an unheralded global success until the coronavirus pandemic struck.

Before the pandemic, the number of stunted children declined globally each year, from 199.5 million in 2000 to 144 million in 2019. The number of children suffering from wasting stood at 54 million in 2010 and had dropped to 47 million last year. It’s expected to rise again to 2010 levels, according to the study.

Biden addresses loved ones of 300,000 Americans who have died of Covid

Phil Helsel

5h ago / 3:47 AM UTC

Sharon Osbourne says she had been in hospital with Covid

Sharon Osbourne, one of the hosts of “The Talk” and the wife of Black Sabbath frontman Ozzy Osbourne, revealed Monday that she has tested positive for Covid-19 and had been hospitalized.

I wanted to share I’ve tested positive for Covid 19. After a brief hospitalization, I’m now recuperating at a location away from Ozzy (who has tested negative) while “The Talk” is on scheduled hiatus. Everyone please stay safe and healthy.

— Sharon Osbourne (@MrsSOsbourne) December 15, 2020

Morgan Chesky

5h ago / 3:36 AM UTC

Vaccine shipments equipped with Bluetooth sensor to ensure delivery, correct temp

The Associated Press

6h ago / 3:25 AM UTC

Alabama loosens licensing rules for doctors as virus rages

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Regulators have loosened rules to make it easier for out-of-state doctors to work in Alabama as the coronavirus pandemic both fills hospital beds and strains medical staff by sickening doctors and nurses, officials said Monday as the first doses of vaccine arrived.

With an average of more than 2,100 people hospitalized daily over the last week with the illness caused by the virus, COVID-19, the Alabama Board of Medical Examiners and the Medical Licensure Commission decided to let qualified physicians from other states and Canada seek temporary emergency licenses to work in the state.

The Alabama Hospital Association has reported staffing shortages caused by both an inadequate number of beds in places and a lack of staff to treat patients, partly because medical workers are among the ill.

Under an emergency rule adopted by regulators during a weekend meeting, doctors licensed in other states or Canada can seek a license to work in an Alabama hospital for 180 days or until Gov. Kay Ivey ends the state’s public health emergency.

Phil Helsel

4h ago / 5:30 AM UTC

More than 213,000 cases reported Monday in U.S.

On the same day that the first people in the United States began receiving the first injections of a Covid-19 vaccine, more than 200,000 cases of the disease were reported.

There were more than 213,000 cases reported Monday and at least 1,400 deaths, according to an NBC News count of reports.

Overall, more than 16.5 million people have been diagnosed with Covid-19 in the U.S. and more than 301,000 have died, according to NBC News’ count.

Phil Helsel

6h ago / 2:49 AM UTC

Georgia man who lied to employer about having Covid pleads guilty

An Atlanta man who earlier this year falsely claimed to his employer that he had been diagnosed with Covid-19 pleaded guilty to a wire fraud charge Monday, federal prosecutors said.

The claim cost the company about $100,000 because the company had temporarily close its facility and have four co-workers quarantine, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Georgia said.

Santwon Antonio Davis, 35, who was charged in May, pleaded guilty to one count of wire fraud.

Davis “caused unnecessary economic loss to his employer and distress to his coworkers and their families,” Byung J. “BJay” Pak, U.S. attorney for the district, said in a statement.

Read the full story here. 

Dasha Burns

7h ago / 1:41 AM UTC

Inside Tennessee’s only children’s Covid ICU ward

Doha Madani

7h ago / 1:37 AM UTC

A ‘moral and ethical struggle’: California nurses threaten strike

A nurses strike scheduled to begin on Christmas Eve threatens operations at three Southern California hospitals as the nurses allege that work conditions put staff safety at risk.

The Hospital Corporation of America on Monday received a 10-day notice of the intent to strike by about 2,450 registered nurses and licensed professionals across three of its hospitals, according to the SEIU Local 121 union chapter, which represents them. The strike would begin Dec. 24 and continue through Jan. 3 at Riverside Community Hospital, Los Robles Regional Medical Center, and West Hills Hospital & Medical Center.

Registered nurses have taken issue with “dangerously low staffing levels” and lack of adequate personal protective equipment that have put them at risk for infection as the coronavirus pandemic continues to overwhelm frontline workers, according to the union.

The Hospital Corporation of America said it a statement that it has bargained in “good faith” to secure a new labor agreement and that the union’s push to have nurses “abandon the beside” was “unconscionable.”

Read the full story here.

Gov. Gavin Newsom: California received as many Covid vaccines as new cases recorded

Erika Edwards

9h ago / 12:34 AM UTC

A ‘constant flow’ of vaccine: Pfizer’s Covid-19 shots begin massive rollout

As the first Covid-19 vaccines were given in the United States on Monday, millions more doses entered the queue for nationwide distribution.

An additional 581 shipments are scheduled for delivery later this week, Army Gen. Gustave Perna, the chief operating officer of Operation Warp Speed, said during a media briefing Monday. Those deliveries will follow a previously announced 636 shipments, set to arrive by Wednesday. Each shipment contains about 1,000 doses.

And Operation Warp Speed officials have already planned for the widespread distribution of a second vaccine, made by Moderna, though it has not yet been granted emergency use authorization by the Food and Drug Administration.

“It is a constant flow of available vaccines,” Perna said. His team is expected to update the nation on the number of available shots each Friday moving forward.

Click here to read the full story.

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